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|Aug 9, 2011

Life in the Sahara Desert Africa

Sahara desert (c) neiljs

Have you ever been complaining how hot and dry the weather have been this days especially during summer? It has been extremely hot than the usual summer season. You might be blaming it on global warming but then again, nothing's much more hotter than be in a desert. Try to take a side trip along Sahara Desert in Africa and you'll surely see how 'hot' it is to be there personally. Mention desert and end up thinking about sands and more sands, however, there's more life in the Sahara, more than you could think of.

The hottest desert on Earth, Sahara Desert, it is where an extremely windy, hot, dust-filled winds create dust devils which makes it more hotter. You might be suffering from dehydration for just staying for a minute there, that's why it's not that surprisingly knowing the plant life in Sahara is sparse, as well as with its wildlife. A blog author states that the Sahara Desert lies in the northern part of Africa. It extends from the Atlantic Ocean all the way to Iraq. It is the largest desert in the world at more than 9,000,000 sq. km (3,500,000 sq. miles). Deserts are mostly made of sand and have a few trees. It barely ever rains in a desert, so it is hot and humid. In Africa, there is a giant sand basin that extends from the Orange River to Angola. Part of this sand basin is known as the Kalahari Desert. The ridges found in the desert were shaped by the wind, and erosion of formations made of soft stone forms some of the sand masses found there. Unlike most deserts, the Kalahari Desert has many different plants like grasses, shrubs, and trees. These plants are able to survive through the many droughts that occur in the desert. Another desert in africa is the Nambi Desert. This desert is home to the highest sand dunes on earth. One of the desert's plants, the Welwitschica, which has two strap-like leaves, is said to live between 1,000 and 2,000 years.

Sahara desert (c) Kazuhisa OTSUBO

Its parched, forbidden landscape took shape over thousands of years, but now, Sahara has been changing. You might thought about sand and rock all the while, but Sahara is a vast area of undisturbed habitat and with small area of vegetation According to Wikipedia,the Sahara is the largest desert on the African continent. The southern border of the Sahara is marked by a band of semi arid savanna called the Sahel; south of the Sahel lies the lusher Sudan and the Congo River Basin. Most of the Sahara consists of rocky hamadaergs (large sand dunes) form only a minor part. People lived on the edge of the desert thousands of years ago since the last ice age. The Sahara was then a much wetter place than it is today. Over 30,000 petroglyphs of river animals such as crocodiles survive, with half found in the Tassili n'Ajjer in southeast AlgeriaFossils of dinosaurs, including AfrovenatorJobaria and Ouranosaurus, have also been found here.

Sahara desert (c) neiljs

It may seem to be one of the unexciting places you'll ever been but, Sahara desert brought out a different perspective that the world is not all about being wet 'n wild. You'll eventually find out some interesting things in desert that would make up your worries. Another blog author states that the Sahara is the biggest 'traditional' (apart from the polar deserts) in the world and stretches across most of Northern Africa from the Atlantic Ocean in the west to the Red Sea in the east, and from the Mediterranean coastline in the north to the Sahel in the south. The classic pictures of endless sanddunes are true to a certain point, as there are larges areas of 'ergs' (sandsea in Arabic) to be found mainly in Algeria and Libya. Most of the Sahara is gravel and rocks though and there are several mountain ranges within its boundaries as well, including the Ahaggar Mountains in Algeria, the Aïr Mountains in Niger and the Tibesti Mountains in Chad. The latter also has the highest point at 3.415 metres above sea level.

Directions

Wikitravel will perfectly guide you to Sahara Desert, Africa.

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By plane

The only international airport is in El Aaiun, the capital. Flights come from the Canary IslandsMorocco, and Spain. Other airports are located in Dakhla and Smara.

By train

There are currently no regular trains from El Aaiún from Marrakech, however a line is planned. There is no train service between Agadir and Al Ayun.

By car

To arrive by car, one must either pass through Moroccan-controlled checkpoints along the border or enter into the Free Zone through Mauritania. The latter has virtually no roads, so driving will be possible only with a sport-utility vehicle. Several checkpoints through Mauritania are closed and there is a huge swath of landmines along the berm. Driving with a few miles of it is extremely dangerous. The Sahrawis have been destroying landmines on their side of the berm, but the territory still has one of the highest concentrations of landmines in the world.

By bus

Buses are present only in large metropolitan districts, such as El Aauin and Smara. There are direct services from Casablanca and Marrakech to Dakhla (running through AgadirTan Tan and Laayoune), frequent services run from Laayoune to major transport hubs in southern Morocco.

By boat

The only boats that go to or from Western Sahara come from the Canaries. In 2010, a new passenger ferry was opened by Naviera Armas from Las Palmas de Gran Canaria.

Guest
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|Sep 6, 2011
0 0
Hi,
This is just fabulous. I wonder where did you get these amazing pictures from. I would love to spend my honeymoon here for sure.
<a href=" http://www.villasthailand.com/">Villas in Thailand</a>
Guest
0
|Oct 12, 2011
0 0
The various parts are in the world are visited by the people. the http://www.gorillatours.co.ug/ is also helpful to the people to visit the rare animals in the forest.
Guest
0
|Oct 31, 2011
0 0
Lovely photos but I wonder how the life will be as I feel it must be tough as desert is never a comfort place to live in.
http://www.onlinehotelsbooking.org/hotels-in-uk
Guest
0
|Oct 31, 2011
1 0
Great photos. I thought about going to the desert when I visited Morocco two years ago. In the end we ruled it out because we were there in August and decided it would be just too hot. Your photos make me wish we'd gone !!
Guest
0
|Jan 30, 2012
0 0
Really awesome report. Thanks!

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